Southeast Missouri Personal Injury Attorneys

1-877-337-6651

FREE CASE EVALUATION

EXPERIENCE. EXCELLENCE. RESULTS.

Blog

Preparing for a consultation with a personal injury lawyer

Designer Creative - Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Scheduling a consultation with a personal injury attorney is a big step toward gaining compensation for you or your loved one. However, to make the most of your meeting, there are a few items you should organize and bring for the attorney to review.

 

What to bring to an initial consultation

 

A narrative of events

If you have not already written down everything describing the event that left you or a loved one injured, do so before you meet with an attorney. A written narrative will help you keep your thoughts organized and help ensure you do not leave out important details. If possible, include relevant dates, times, addresses and names. The more specific your narrative is, the better.

 

Copies of all forms relevant to the injury:

  • •Incident or accident reports

    • •Drivers’ licenses

      • •Contact information of everyone involved

      • •Medical paperwork and bills

      • •Records of lost wages or missed work days

  • •Insurance policies

 

Copies of correspondence

Anything you have about your personal injury in writing can be helpful for your case. For example, if you were emailing your insurance company about the injury, bring email copies to the consultation. Informal means of communication, like text messages with a supervisor about missing work or even with a friend about the pain you’re experiencing, can help a lawyer gain more insight into your situation.

 

A list of questions

Take some time before your meeting to sit with a pen and paper away from distractions and jot down every concern that comes to mind. Once you’re done, reform your thoughts into a list questions for your meeting. Here are some ideas to get you started:

•How many personal injury clients have you represented?

•What is your communication process?

•What steps do I need to take to help us reach a successful outcome?

•Do you think an expert witness would help in my case? Would you be able to contact one?

•Does the statute of limitations apply to my case?

•Would you be handling my case or would there be a team to support me?

 

A personal injury attorney should never charge you for an initial meeting. You both should be taking this time to get to know each other and learn more about how you could work together.

 

To see if our experienced team of professionals is right to represent you or your loved one, contact us to set up a no-cost consultation.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

What to do if you or a loved one is the victim of medical negligence

Designer Creative - Thursday, April 05, 2018

Medical negligence is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., behind heart disease and cancer.* For many people the medical profession and those who work within it can be very intimidating. Most people are taught from an early age that physicians are trusted sources of advice and that their decisions and recommendations should not be questioned; but sometimes those decisions have life-altering outcomes that negatively affect patients and their loved ones. When this occurs it is critical to know what steps to take to hold those at fault accountable for their actions.

 

Medical Malpractice

Any act or omission by a healthcare professional during treatment of a patient that deviates from accepted norms of practice, often referred to as the standard of care, and that causes an injury to the patient is considered medical malpractice. This may include:

 

  • •Failure to diagnose
  • •Drug and pharmacy errors
  • •Surgical procedure complications
  • •Childbirth injuries
  • •Inadequate follow-up care
  • •Medical device defects
  • •Nursing home neglect
  •  

In order to succeed in a medical negligence case, the injured party or the person acting on behalf of the injured party must prove that the provider’s negligence directly caused or directly contributed to cause injury or damages to a patient. Proving negligence – defined as the failure to act with the same degree of skill and learning ordinarily used under the same or similar circumstances by members of the provider’s profession – is the key to a successful malpractice claim.

 

Don't wait to seek help. 

 

Medical negligence cases are barred if you do not bring them within a specific time period referred to as the statute of limitations. In general, the statute of limitations is two years after the medical malpractice event; but there are four recognized exceptions to this limitation under Missouri law. The exceptions are the “foreign object” exception, the “failure to inform” exception, the “minor child” exception and the “continuing treatment” exception. The rules regarding statutes of limitation in general, as well as the recognized exceptions to such statutes, are strictly construed so you should consult an attorney immediately in any case where you believe medical negligence may have occurred. In medical malpractice cases the sooner you act the better because if you miss the statutory deadline you will not be able to file suit to hold the negligent party or parties responsible for the harm they have caused.
 
Contact us, and we will help you determine if your case has merit during a no-cost consultation.
 
The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

 

 

 

 

Playground Safety Tips

Designer Creative - Friday, April 28, 2017

The Consumer Product Safety Commission reports that nearly 200,000 kids in the U.S. get treatment in emergency rooms each year for injuries related to playground equipment. Below are some tips to help keep your child safe:

 

Check equipment for faults.

Before your child runs to the slide or jumps on the swing, examine the equipment for any rusted or broken parts and make sure the surface material beneath equipment is sand, mulch or shredded rubber. Surfaces such as asphalt, dirt or gravel do not absorb impact and may result in serious injuries if a child falls. Also, make sure the surfacing is at least 12 inches deep and extends six feet in all directions around equipment.

 

Have your child use age-appropriate equipment.

A 3-year-old should not use equipment meant for a 10-year-old. Most playgrounds provide separate areas with age-appropriate equipment for children under 5 years old.

 

Supervise your child.

Watch your children to make sure they play safely, and warn them if they are about to jump from a high surface or take other risks. Explain that shoving or crowding others on playground equipment can be dangerous. Teaching them safe behaviors will help them enjoy being outdoors while avoiding injury.

 

Despite your best efforts, a playground injury may occur. If that happens, the first step is to make sure your child receives medical care. Try to document the injury as thoroughly as possible and contact a personal injury attorney if you believe the injury is due to faulty equipment or negligence. To get started, check out our resources page or contact us at 877-337-6651 for a free consultation.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based on advertising alone.

Crash factors series: Timing

Designer Creative - Monday, April 17, 2017

Are you more likely to be in a collision at certain times?

 

 It makes sense that your odds of being in a vehicle crash go up when more cars are on the road. Which is why statistically, more crashes occur in late afternoon and evening (when most drivers are headed home from work). In the U.S., about 16% of fatal car wrecks occur between 3 and 6 p.m. each year.*

 

Another likely time period to be in a fatal crash is 6 p.m. to midnight, attributed to the affect alcohol and drowsy driving has on crash rates. Some holidays also see a jump in car crashes – the 4th of July is widely recognized at the most deadly day of the year to be on the road.**

 

In addition, your chance of being in a crash increases significantly on Saturdays, especially in the early morning hours. The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety estimates that 31% of fatal drunk-driving crashes occur then.

 

Regardless of timing, your odds of being in a car crash decrease exponentially when you avoid drunk and distracted driving and practice other safe driving behaviors – like wearing your seatbelt, using your car’s running lights and paying attention to your surroundings.

 

If you or a loved one has been injured in a vehicle collision and someone else is at fault, make sure you understand your rights. Learn more: Client Resources

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

 

*NHTSA

**IIHS

Crash factors series: Location, location, location

Designer Creative - Saturday, April 08, 2017

Does your location put you at higher risk for a crash?

 

Statistically, there are a few key places where you’re more likely to be in a wreck. Topping the list is rural areas, where fatal crashes are 30 percent more likely to occur compared to urban areas. In addition, about 150 people die and 10,000 are injured in collisions with deer each year.*

 

For more minor fender benders, your odds are highest in parking lots. And lastly, that old saying about accidents happening close to home is actually true. A recent survey found that more than 50 percent of reported crashes occur within five or fewer miles from home.**

 

No matter where you are, it’s critical to always be aware of driving conditions and your surroundings. Avoid distracted driving and other behaviors that put you at risk for a crash. If you or a loved one has been injured in a vehicle collision and someone else is at fault, it’s important to make sure you work with an attorney experienced in personal injury cases.

 

Learn about some important factors to consider when hiring an attorney.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

 

 *esurance

*Progressive

 

Crash factors series: Driving age

Designer Creative - Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Does your age put you at greater risk for a car crash?

 

New drivers – those between the ages of 16 and 19 – are three times more likely to be involved in a vehicle crash than those over age 20, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. In addition, auto crashes are the leading cause of death among teens in the U.S.*

 

The second age category most likely to be involved in a crash are drivers age 75 and over. In 2014, more than 5,700 older adults were killed and more than 236,000 were treated in emergency departments for motor vehicle crash injuries.*

 

Regardless of age, factors like seatbelt use and impaired driving have a significant impact on your likelihood of dying in a car crash. If you or a loved one has been injured in a vehicle collision and someone else is at fault, it’s important to understand your options.

 

Learn more about your rights: Client Resources

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

 

*CDC

Crash factors series: Color-coding car wrecks

Designer Creative - Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Are some vehicle paint colors more dangerous than others?

 

There’s no easy answer to that question. Various studies over the last decade have analyzed the possible correlation between vehicle color and crash rates, with differing results. But one common finding among multiple studies is that black vehicles seem to be involved in more wrecks than vehicles of other colors.

 

In 2013, the Accident Research Center at Monash University in New Zealand studied data from 850,000 crashes over a 20-year period, and determined that black vehicles were 47 percent more likely to be involved in an accident than white vehicles (attributed to lower visibility on roadways).

 

But there are far more recognizable contributing factors to auto crashes than car color, such as distracted driving. If you or a loved one has been injured in a vehicle collision and someone else is at fault, it’s important to educate yourself on your rights.

 

Learn more about the process for filing a claim: Client Resources

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

Top 10 Most Dangerous Jobs In The U.S.

Designer Creative - Wednesday, February 22, 2017

For many workers, each day on the job brings the threat of injury. Although they may do everything possible to stay safe, accidents and machine malfunctions happen. Below is a list of the 10 most dangerous jobs in America, as determined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

10) While transporting dangerous machinery such as mowers, landscapers face the threat of injury every day.

 

9) Power line installers and repairers are most often injured by shocks and burns from electrical lines.

 

8) Because truck drivers spend a lot of time on the highway, many are injured in vehicle crashes.

 

7) Farmers are frequently hurt by equipment malfunctions, particularly tractors.

 

6) Falling is the greatest threat for iron and steel workers.

 

5) Vehicle collisions are especially dangerous for garbage collectors, who typically ride on the side of trucks.

 

4) Roofers deal with the constant risk of falling from high places.

 

3) Plane malfunctions kill or injure many aircraft pilots each year.

 

2) Fishing workers face many threats at sea, particularly the destruction of boats and ships.

 

1) And the number one most dangerous job in America is logging workers. Due to injuries caused by falling objects such as limbs from trees, this workforce has the highest on-the-job injury rate.

 

Educate yourself about your rights if you’re injured while at work and contact us if you have questions about a potential personal injury claim: 1-877-337-6651.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based on advertising alone.

What Not To Do After A Car Wreck

Designer Creative - Wednesday, February 15, 2017

If you ever find yourself in a vehicle crash, regardless of who’s at fault, it’s important to know what you should – and should not – do to keep yourself safe and protect your potential legal claim.

 

Don’t leave the scene

If you can, move your vehicle a safe distance away from oncoming traffic but don’t leave the scene of a crash without speaking to law enforcement. If possible, take photos of the crash scene in addition to exchanging insurance information with others involved in the incident.

 

Don’t admit fault

Missouri recognizes the Pure Comparative Fault Rule, which allows a damaged party to recover even if he/she is 99 percent at fault. Even if you contributed to a vehicle crash, if others drivers are also at fault, you may still have a personal injury claim and be able to recover damages. So it’s important not to admit fault, especially to the other party’s insurance company.

 

Don’t avoid medical care

If you’ve been in a vehicle crash, you should seek medical care even if you don’t feel like your injuries are serious right after the incident. It’s possible to sustain long-term injuries – such as spinal or brain injuries – that aren’t immediately apparent right after a collision. Not seeking medical care can impact your personal injury case.

 

Don’t try to go it alone

An experienced personal injury attorney can not only determine if you have a case, but help you maximize your compensation. Most reputable attorneys offer a case evaluation at no charge to you.

 

Learn more about how to hire the best attorney for your case.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

How to Deal with Your Catastrophic Hit-and-Run Injury

Designer Creative - Monday, January 09, 2017

Watching those responsible for your injuries flee the scene of a traffic collision can be a horrifying experience. If you have been injured at the fault of an unidentified person, do not attempt to apprehend anyone on your own. Here are some key steps to take to help build a personal injury case:

 

What do I do if I’ve been injured in a hit-and-run?

 

Call 911. Tell the operator you have been injured in a hit-and-run. The operator will alert emergency personnel. When the police arrive, relay as much information as you can about the other vehicle and driver. Be specific about the time of the wreck, location and driving conditions. Do not admit fault at any time. Point out any witnesses to the police. Take photos of the scene as well, including weather and road conditions.

 

When speaking with a medical provider, share all of your symptoms and the specifics of your crash.

 

Take down names of everyone you speak to: medical providers, paramedics, police and any witnesses. Write down all the events with distinct details as soon as possible.

 

How do I pay for my medical bills? What if they never catch the other driver?

In Missouri, money will come from your own insurance, specifically the policies pertaining to uninsured motorists. Because Missouri law requires Missouri residents have uninsured motorist coverage of at least $25,000 per person for bodily injury, your insurance should help pay medical bills.

 

However, insurance companies aren’t in the habit of writing out checks without finding ways to reduce costs first. If you’re struggling to cope with your injuries, you may not have the ability to fight for the money you need. To fully understand your legal options, speak with an attorney.

 

For a free case consultation, contact Cook, Barkett, Ponder & Wolz at 1 (877) 337-6651.

 

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

 


Recent Posts


Tags


Archive

CONNECT

E-Newsletter Signup

Signup for CBPW’s free e-newsletter today

Submitting Form...

The server encountered an error.

Form received.

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

© 2018 Cook Barkett Ponder & Wolz. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited.

1-877-337-6651

  1-877-337-6651

The choice of a lawyer is an important decision and should not be based upon advertisements alone.

© 2017 Cook Barkett Ponder & Wolz. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited.